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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 17, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: thirty minutes from destruction — firefighters are praised for risking their lives to save notre—dame cathedral. solidarity along the seine. last night hundreds of parisians turned out for a candlelit vigil to pay homage to the 850—year—old gothic structure. extra time for new mums and dads — campaigners call on the government to extend parental leave forfamilies with premature babies. avoiding double holiday heartache — if you have to cancel your trip unexpectedly, what are your refund rights? why are there calls for stronger regulation?
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in sport, it gets messi for manchester united. no nou camp fairytale for ole gunnar solskjaer as his side are knocked out of the champions league by a brilliant barcelona. the view of earth from space — we'll find out how the team behind bbc one's latest documentary series captured these stunning shots. some dense fog to watch out for this morning, particularly across england but when that lives will have a sunny day and it is getting warmer. — — when that lift. it's wednesday 17th of april. our top story: firefighters have been praised for risking their lives to save notre—dame cathedral, as it's revealed the historic building came within minutes of being completely destroyed. more than half a billion pounds has now been pledged to help fund the restoration, which president macron has promised will be completed within five years.
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but some architechts warn his plans are too optimistic. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. (music playing). hundredsjoined hundreds joined together for a vigil on the banks of the seine last night to show solidarity in the face of this most unexpected of traumas. they sang hymns and said prayers and paid tribute to those who rest their lives to save this world famous landmark. inside the 850 year old cathedral, the damages now on display for all to see. the fire took hold of the ancient wooden roof, burning through hundreds of tons of oak injusta through hundreds of tons of oak injust a few through hundreds of tons of oak in just a few hours, raining ashen members onto the floor below and toppling the famous spire. 500 firefighters battled for four hours
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before managing to get the blaze under control. another 30 minutes in the story would have been one of complete destruction, something paris would have found difficult to bear. though the stone structure is still standing, there has been a significant damage. 25% of the artworks it is estimated have gone. the crown of thorns, some believe was warned byjesus on the cross, several paintings and the mediaeval organ and famous rosa windows remain and at this restoring of buildings will be repaired. translation: yes, we will rebuild the notre—dame cathedral and it will be more beautiful than it was before and it will be done in five years. hundreds of millions of euros have already been pledged for the cause. notre—dame has survived but it has been badly scarred. it will now become one of the world most important restoration programmes.
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kathryn stanczyszen, bbc news. universities are being accused of using gagging orders to stop bullying, discrimination and sexual misconduct allegations becoming public. dozens of academics have told the bbc they were harassed out of theirjobs and made to sign non—disclosure agreements after making complaints. figures show uk universities have spent at least £87 million on payoffs since 2017. rianna croxford reports. i have been bullied for six years across to universities by the same man. once designed to protect trade secrets, now creating a culture of silence, nondisclosure agreements are keeping allegations of misconduct in the dark. feeling trapped but desperate to be heard. after i complained i was advised to signa nda after i complained i was advised to sign a nda and leave only to be followed by the bully and continue his arrestment. i am harassed. many
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have faced racist and sex sexist bullying. one woman said she was disciplined for not being at work on the day of her miscarriage. this academic has decided to break her nda. she signed one during ongoing grievances relating to her disabilities, teaching and research, particularly following her cancer diagnosis. i want to encourage people to break there's because we cannot see each other and are therefore cannot be a community. the university of liverpool said... the government is trying to tighten the rules on what nda's are useful.
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these women hope breaking their silence will mean they stop being used. the metropolitan police say they've now arrested nearly 300 people involved in climate change protests in london. the demonstrations have led to road closures, traffic jams and disruption to bus services, affecting more than 500,000 commuters. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has urged the protesters not to go ahead with plans to try to disrupt tube services. eating even moderate amounts of ham, bacon and red meat is linked to an increased risk of bowel cancer, according to new research. the study, led by oxford university, found that those who stuck to the nhs guideline of eating about 70 grammes of red or processed meat a day — that's a slice of roast beef and a rasher of bacon, still increased their risk of bowel cancer by a fifth compared to those who ate very small amounts. for people who are looking to reduce the risk of cancer the advice is the
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less you eat the lower the risk. this does not mean you have to com pletely this does not mean you have to completely give up bacon or go vegetarian if you do not want to simple ways you can cut down on the amount you are eating can make a big difference in your risk of bowel cancer. not enough support is being given to help people affected by the windrush scandal claim compensation, according to some of those who've lost their homes, jobs and access to benefits. earlier this month, the home secretary sajid javid announced there would be no limit on the amount of money victims could claim. our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell reports. this time last year, sylvester marshall, who was born injamaica, was denied life—saving nhs treatments for prostate cancer. 12 months on, he's finally had radiotherapy and is now in remission. but at one point he was faced with a £54,000 health bill, despite living in the uk since the early 1970s. it was really rough. a bad experience.
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because even when they had been evicted, i tried to get my medication. everything was just locked away. i could never get hold of it at all. which i think was really terrible. as well as a delay to his healthcare, he lost his job as a mechanic and is still living in a hostel. his case was one of the most high profile when the scale of the scandal first came to light 12 months ago. can she tell the house how many have been detained as prisoners in their own country? can she tell the house how many have been denied health under the national health service? how many have denied pensions? how many have lost theirjob? this is a day of national shame. newsreel: the empire windrush brings to britain 500 jamaicans. a large number of people affected arrived in the uk between 19118 and 1971. some as children on their parents' passports,
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known as the windrush generation. they were granted indefinite leave to remain. but many weren't given their own formal documents. glenda caesar and her sisterjoyce came to the uk from dominica in the 1960s. not having the right paperwork recently led to the end of their careers in the nhs and police service, causing the whole family to suffer. i'm not only fighting this for me or my sister, ‘cause i get calls a regular basis where people aren't able to understand what's going on, and "where do i go to, glenda? who do i turn to?" "i'm going through this." and they're just coming out of the woodwork. and they're like "i don't know what to do." the family now hope compensation will go some way to helping overcome the trauma they've experienced. adina campbell, bbc news. the president of ecuador has made renewed allegations about the behaviour of the wikileaks founder, julian assange,
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during his seven year stay at the ecuadorean embassy in london. lenin moreno told the bbc that he withdrew mr assange's asylum, after repeated incidences of unacceptable behaviour, which he says broke their agreement. the campaign to protect rural england says only one in 50 people can now experience the natural beauty of a truly dark sky that's full of stars, because of light pollution. the countryside charity is urging councils to do more to limit the impact of artificial light from streets and buildings, including having public areas with dimmed lighting and using more energy efficient bulbs this is an amazing story. a dog found swimming 135—miles off the coast of thailand is now back on dry land. "boon—rod" — which means "the saved one" — was found by the crew of an oil tanker in the middle of the gulf of thailand. they believe he may have fallen off a fishing boat. he's said to be recovering well
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and a new home has already been lined up. that is just an extraordinarily marvellous story. a brilliant colour. 135 miles! it must have come offa colour. 135 miles! it must have come off a boat. surely. how lovely to see you. good morning and reflecting oi'i see you. good morning and reflecting ona see you. good morning and reflecting on a night of pretty much humiliation for manchester united. thoroughly outplayed. it emphasises the size of the job for ole gunnar solskjaer. they have lost five of the last seven for the champions league. now they have to concentrate oi'i league. now they have to concentrate on getting in the top for so they can qualify for the champions league next season. which is the basis of a can hope for.
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there was no fairytale comeback for manchester united in the nou camp. unlike 20 years ago when his goals turn the match around for bayern munich. two goals for lionel messi and then this brilliant third from philippe coutinho gave barcelona a 3—0 win on the night, 4—0 on aggregate, to send them into the semi finals of the champions league. there was a big, big win for cardiff in the premier league, they've given themselves hope of staying up, and dragged brighton right into the relegation battle after beating them 2—0. they're now separated byjust two points. england announce their squad for the cricket world cup this afternoon, and it could include this man — joffra archer. it would be a controversial selection, because, he was born in barbados, but now qualifies to play for england, and some players aren't happy. and ireland's katie taylor, will get the chance to become an undisputed world champion in june. it's been announced she'll fight in new york, on anthonyjoshua's undercard.
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more for you in the papers in a moment. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. i saw the glimpse of a chart that was mostly yellow! it is turning warmer for most of us. for the next few days, plenty of sunshine around. at times a bit of cloud. this is what we reached yesterday in london. he throw 17.5. we are expecting higher temperatures today. we are stuck in a week whether front. rain for scotland, dampness for parts of england and wales and the other thing to watch out for this morning is fog, dense fog across parts of central and southern england and south—western england in particular. that will lift and then we're looking at of
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dry weather. the chance of a shower. these temperatures above average for this stage in april. something else you might want to bear in mind is pollen levels are high across most of england, wales. it is tree pollen. overnight, once again we have cloud coming in from the east, spreading across with maybe some drizzle. still quite breezy as well but no problem with the temperatures. not anticipating any frost. lows of 7—9d. the wind direction is changing and we have a cool north—westerly wind moving towards a south—easterly from the continent, indicated by the bright yellow and ambers. it does mean the temperature is on the rise. for
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thursday morning, mist and fog lifting and once again we are looking at the largely dry day with a lot of sunshine and still quite breezy temperatures by then 20, possibly 21. around the midlands where we are likely to see 21. they are going up, you can see what i mean. the good friday, we start with mist and fog that would lift and then a lot of dry weather around. a fair bit of sunshine and again, highs of 21 in london. belfast seeing 17. this trend will continue into saturday and saturday some places will see highs of 2a, possibly 25. the most likely area for that to the west of london. you can still see high temperatures. during saturday, a week whether front coming in across the north—west of scotland, sinking
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south. sunday into monday, the weather front ringing some rain. temperatures slipping back down to closer where they should be. a slight change to the weather forecast. love those numbers. very nice. let us have a look at the front pages. the metro has a dramatic image of firefighters entering notre—dame cathedral in paris. the paper hails them as heroes along with the catholic priest, fatherjean—marc fournier, who dashed into the burning cathedral to save its most "precious treasures". the mail also features a picture of a golden cross which survived the notre dame fire. its lead story is about the record number of women over 50 who are in work — and not necessarily by choice. the telegraph shows a wider shot of that cross, amid the charred
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rubble of notre—dame. it also reports on plans being considered by home secretary sajid javid, which would allow minor offences to be wiped from criminals' records when they apply for jobs. and the mirror leads with an exclusive report which claims the duchess of sussex is hoping to employ an american nanny — . meaning a male nanny — for her and prince harry's baby, which is due to arrive in the next few weeks. and this tweet is typical of the social media pile—on suffered by manchester united after they were crushed by barcelona last night. the caption claims that this picture shows the united keeper, david de gea, every time he faces a shot by lionel messi. it is, in fact, a picture of the actress sandra bullock, in the recent netflix thriller, bird box. he got some real grief. wheels coming off cars seem to be a common
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tweet. it's really scary. it's quite clever and that you never actually see the bad things. thank you for explaining that to me. see the bad things. thank you for explaining that to melj see the bad things. thank you for explaining that to me. i was going to pay tribute to somebody but it's too early to see right now. if you think about delilah, sung by the welsh fans and stoke fans as well, marching on together by leeds united, but there is reed who co—wrote delilah with sir tom jones, les reed, who penned some of those foot ball les reed, who penned some of those football anthems. they will continue to be sung. it's a beauty. he hasn't really changed much. have heard about the weather from carol. a lot swimming in the sea. if you go endorse it, you might come across one of these. it is a barrel
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jellyfish but the great they don't sting. harmless to humans. jellyfish but the great they don't sting. harmless to humanslj jellyfish but the great they don't sting. harmless to humans. i expect if you came face—to—face of it, you might have an intake of both. have you done a triathlon when you've come out with jellyfish. i've swung with jellyfish, i quite come out with jellyfish. i've swung withjellyfish, i quite liked it. they didn't sting me. i could tell you terrible stories. swimming out here outside the studios in salford quaysin here outside the studios in salford quays in the summer, there are no jellyfish. just supermarket trolleys. i've seen the dredger cope passed regularly. i wanted to quickly go back to that story, women who can't give up working, yesterday unemployment figures came up and unemployment figures came up and unemployment is lowest it's been since1974 and unemployment is lowest it's been since 1974 and what's interesting unemployment is lowest it's been since1974 and what's interesting is previously, inactive workers are driving those figures. over 505
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women. i'm not sure we have a choice. salaries are outstripping inflation. despite all the concern about the politics. actually unemployment is down and salaries are going. i love going on holiday to cornwall. one of the best things about it is you can't get mobile phone coverage but that is changing. what they are doing is, vodafone is
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installing little antenna in the boxes of unused mobile phone boxes so boxes of unused mobile phone boxes so in some places, i used to not be able to get coverage, you will actually get reception within 200m. that was one of the best things. women were doing the comic relief thing in kilimanjaro, there was no phone coverage. wejust thing in kilimanjaro, there was no phone coverage. we just talked. have a look at this picture from dorset. i walk a look at this picture from dorset. iwalk in a look at this picture from dorset. i walk in the wild side. this fellow here, unnamed, 28, and he actually caused some sort of coastguard scramble because he climbed to the end of the little door to take a selfie and he had a cigarette but they called the coastguard because he just they called the coastguard because hejust had jeans they called the coastguard because he just had jeans and trainers on so
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the warning is, don't be stupid. one of my favourite fact... no, sorry, the differences. a need to talk about this. this is based on the fa ct about this. this is based on the fact that, how many people take selfie photos, and how many people swim with sharks. before you get me in trouble with shark lovers, i'm not saying we should go out and spear sharks. it's quite dangerous. more people are killed by lawnmower5 in the us. there are 80 billion lawnmowers in the us. in the us. there are 80 billion lawnmowers in the use in the us. there are 80 billion lawnmowers in the us. i think you need to stop when you start saying 18 billion. almost £600 millino has already been pledged to help notre—dame rebuild, after monday's massive
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fire. but what will the restoration involve? we've sentjohn maguire to york cathedral, which was seriously damaged by fire 35 years ago, to find out. if there is a silver lining, york minster basic went to a very similar process as you say, 35 years ago in the work done here is incredible. you just couldn't tell today. you rememberfrom the you just couldn't tell today. you remember from the pictures of the time, the fire that engulfed this, the south transept, the rose window broken to 40,000 pieces. some of the damage caused, just left as a reminder for visitors damage caused, just left as a reminderfor visitors to damage caused, just left as a reminder for visitors to york minster. seeing some of the damage and the burning embers. one of the things that saved the entire cathedral was the fact that firefighters were able to ring the
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roof down, stop the flames spreading to the rest of york minster which would have been of course an absolute disaster. i just would have been of course an absolute disaster. ijust want would have been of course an absolute disaster. i just want to introduce you tojohn david, master stone most. —— master stonemason. just talk us through this. yes, the roofers into sections. the inner side, the wooden vault, the outer roof was covered with the lead in the fire actually started right up the fire actually started right up the apex of the roof at the southern end of the transept and the fire spread very quickly. the area in there would be full of dust. all the dust caught fire and it spread to the vault. the difference in notre dame is that the vault is a stone vault. it was basically a fire precaution in those days. we
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persisted with the firefighters in the end. one of the things that save the end. one of the things that save the entire church. the fire is burning in the roof. the flames are looking around, going up into the lantern tower and it could have set fire to the roof up there. the decision, the quick decision was trying to drop the roof here. the authorities in paris will no doubt be contacting you to pick their brains. the major thing is decision—making, how to rebuild
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them. i'm not sure, i've heard some trees would be required. you want the gradual reconstruction and hopefully they can use traditional crafts. it's a wonderful opportunity to train people. i think all the prescience and on the french people would like how it was in traditional materials. thank you very much indeed. this is exactly what happened in york minster. 35 years ago. we will see some of the craftsmen that work here at york minster, some of the stonemasons will see the works. incredible work. these buildings were built way back on the 13th century, some of those
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traditional skills still remain and will be absolutely vital and central in doing the repairs in paris. it is a long rebuild there. the president is referencing five years. i was speaking to an architect who said te na nt speaking to an architect who said tenant leased but you never know, there seems to be money coming in from all over the world. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. we'll hear about the campaign calling for parents of premature babies to automatically be allowed extended leave from work, to care for their new child. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor, sadiq khan, says he's "extremely concerned" about plans for climate change activists to target tube services today. nearly 300 people have been arrested
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over two days of action by the group extinction rebellion which has seen roads blocked in central london. retailers claim they've lost 10 million pounds in trade over the last two days and are concerned for staff and customers sales are down, retailers going through difficult. and it's disrupt so we through difficult. and it's disrupt so we asking them out to get a hold of this and stop the destruction in the west end. extinction rebellion has apologised for disruption but says it believes that the action is needed to bring about action on climate change. today marks the 20th anniversary of the brixton market nail bombing. it was the first of three nail bomb attacks over two weeks in london— targeting the capital's black, bangladeshi and gay communities— other devices exploded in brick lane and the admiral duncan pub in soho.
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three people were killed and a hundred and forty others injured. a charity set up to help sick babies and mothers is hoping to change attitudes towards donating breast milk. the hearts milk bank is an independent service — which delivers to 15 neonatal units in london and seriously ill mums. its founders say their aim is to highlight how life saving breast milk can be, like other types of donations, and change negative perceptions. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there the travel situation now. is a planned action by clin change there is a planned action by climate change activists. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. there may be a little bit of misting us out there this
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morning. it's not widespread but you may get about your tutor to the west and south—west of london but it will lift to a day of warm sunshine. day by day this week, the temperature is steadily rising, thanks to the high—pressure. a gentle easterly, south—easterly breezes are perhaps a little bit cooler out towards the essex coast. elsewhere, it is starting to feel pretty warm. some cloud bubbling up into the afternoon in temperatures reaching 20 celsius in central london. like i said, over towards the east, it's likely to feel a little cooler. overnight tonight, again, clear skies, temperatures not dropping too far thanks to the heat generated during the day. not as cold as the last couple of nights. 7— eight celsius, the minimum temperature. interest thursday, more sunshine. lots of dry weather as we had closer to the easter weekend. temperatures low 20s by saturday, you could even see 2425dc. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. now though it's back to louise and dan. hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning have you ever felt you've been treated unfairly when cancelling a holiday? nina's taking a look at your rights, just before 7:00 this morning. later, the story of earth from space. the crew behind bbc one's latest documentary will be here to tell us how they filmed these amazing pictures. and, the popularity of the proms is rising year after year. so what does 2019's spectacular have in store? we'll be finding out after 8:00. good morning. here's a summary of today's main
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stories from bbc news: firefighters have been praised for risking their lives to save notre—dame cathedral, as it's revealed the historic building came within minutes of being completely destroyed. more than half a billion pounds has now been pledged to help fund the restoration, which president macron has promised will be completed within five years. but some architects warn his plans are too optimistic. universities are being accused of using gagging orders to stop bullying, discrimination and sexual misconduct allegations becoming public. dozens of academics have told the bbc they were harassed out of theirjobs and made to sign non—disclosure agreements after making complaints. figures show uk universities have spent at least £87 million on payoffs since 2017. the metropolitan police say they've now arrested nearly three hundred people involved in climate change protests in london. the demonstrations have led to road closures, trafficjams and disruption to bus services, affecting more than 500,000 commuters.
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the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has urged the protesters not to go ahead with plans to try to disrupt tube services. mums—to—be should be routinely offered an ultrasound scan at 36—weeks, to help stop risky breech deliveries, when a baby's bottom orfeet emerge first. researchers from the university of cambridge, say the extra scans would avoid 4000 emergency caesareans and eight baby deaths a year in england. currently, midwives and doctors tend to rely on the shape and feel of the mother's bump to check. eating even moderate amounts of ham, bacon and red meat is linked to an increased risk of bowel cancer, according to new research. the study, led by oxford university, found that those who stuck to the nhs guideline of eating about 70—grammes of red or processed meat a day, that's a slice of roast beef and a rasher of bacon, still increased their risk of bowel cancer by a fifth compared to those who ate very small amounts.
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for people who are looking to reduce the risk of cancer the advice is the less you eat the lower the risk. this does not mean you have to completely give up bacon or go vegetarian if you do not want to but simple ways you can cut down on the amount you are eating can make a big difference in your risk of bowel cancer. netflix attracted a record number of new subscribers in the first three months of this year. but shares in the online tv and film streaming service have fallen after it warned it expected the pace of growth to slow. netflix now has nearly 149—million subscribers around the world. british workers put in the longest hours of any country in the european union, according to a study by the tuc. the trade union says full—time employees in the uk average 42 hours a week,
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almost two more than a typical eu worker. it says workers in countries such as germany and denmark, are more productive than their uk counterparts, despite working fewer hours. we were speaking about a four—day week and that it is much better. and more productive. it would be much better for you, wouldn't it. good morning. good morning indeed. nice to have you on a wednesday. you are looking very bronze. to have you on a wednesday. you are looking very bronzelj to have you on a wednesday. you are looking very bronze. i have been away. you have your hands as well. do put 5un5creen on your lips, like idid do put 5un5creen on your lips, like i did not. bli5ter5. i hope they do not look that big they are sore.
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remember the old australian terry alderman who came out with his lips all white. another champions league. a lionel messi ma5tercla55 and other5. a lionel messi ma5tercla55 and others. no sentiment or a lionel messi masterclass and others. no sentiment or nostalgia in football. 20 years ago ole gunnar solskjaer turned it around for bayern munich but could not do so for manchester united. it's all over for manchester united in the champions league, blown away by barcelona, at the nou camp — as natalie pirks reports. they said they were here for the love not the glory and fans in the sun would soon turn cold. the
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arrogance of barcelona but united's flame was soon extinguished and things were about to get messy. arnold messy‘s 24th came courtesy of a mistake. the shot wriggling under the goalkeeper. remarkably, it was to get worse. what a way to silence his critics. sanches almost pulled offa his critics. sanches almost pulled off a consolation in his old hunting ground but the night belonged to one man, this mesmerising magician — doesn't it always? so barcelona through to the last four, and they'll be joined by ajax who beat the italian champions juventus to go through in turin. after knocking out champions real madrid in the last round, they upset
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the odds once again. matthijs de ligt with the winner — he's the captain of this side atjust 19 years of age. brilliant result for a historically huge club in european football — this is their first semi final since 1997. there will be at least one english team, in the semi—finals. tonight tottenham go to manchester city, looking to preserve the 1—0 lead, they have from last week's, first leg. this could be a make or break week, for city, as they continue their pursuit of the quadruple. they face spurs again, at the etihad in the premier league on saturday. liverpool meanwhile have one foot in the last four. they lead their quarter—final tie, with porto 2—0, ahead of tonight's second leg. bossjurgen klopp says his side are confident, and are going to portugal to win. in the words of their manager, cardiff city are alive and kicking, in the premier league after beating brighton 2—0. realistically one of these two sides, is likely to be relegated, so this was a huge win for cardiff. it takes them to within two points of brighton in that race to stay up, and gives neil warnock‘s side
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hope,with four games left to go. everybody knew how big it is. we could be relegated really if we lose the game today. we're not going to catch up any points at this level it makes it interesting because we do not give up and i thought it was too good goals and we played some good stuff. we had a few pundits saying it would be our final game stuff. we had a few pundits saying it would be ourfinal game in the premier league but we are alive and kicking. now england announce their squad for the cricket world cup later today, and there could be a controversial new call. this isjoffra archer taking the wicket of the west indies batsman chris gayle in the ipl yesterday. archer's a bowler who was born in barbados but qualifies for england under the ecb's new residency rules, but one team mate says it would be unfair to disrupt the england side. selection is part and parcel of the game and the job that we do so fair
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is probably not the right word. you know, it probably wouldn't be fair morally but, at the same time, it is the nature of international spot and if someone was to miss out it would be incredibly unlucky but it is up to the selectors. the australian rugby player, israel folau, is going to challenge his sacking over a homophobic post on social media. rugby australia cancelled his contract after folau said that "hell awaits" gay people. the post remains online and at the weekend the 30—year—old said he was standing by "what the bible says". one man who's supported folau is the england forward billy vunipola. he got a formal warning from the rugby football union yesterday, but his club saracens say they'll stand by him and want to move on. adam peaty‘s showing no signs of slowing down in the swimming pool. the olympic champion made sure he's off to south korea for this summer's world championships by comfortably winning the 100 metres breast stroke at the british championships in sheffield last night. he's back to number one in the world, and he say‘s that's "job done".
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there's some doubt over anthonyjoshua's next big fight. he's scheduled to fight jarrell miller in new york onjune1st, but promoter eddie hearn has confirmed that miller has provided an adverse sample to anti—doping authorites. we'll have to wait to see what that means for that fight. ireland's katie taylor could become an undisputed world champion later this summer. she'll fight belgium's delfine persoon injune who holds the one belt that taylor's yet to win. and finally we've got some racket smashing for you. this is novak djokovic in monte carlo as he prepares for the french open continue, but the world number one totally lost it when he gave away a service game. he did go onto beat philipp kohlschreiber. did he get punished for it?|j did he get punished for it? i do not know. you do not normally see that from mrjock of each. he is normally
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very cool. should we find out what is happening in the weather? for the next two days it will turn warmer. sea breezes developing. plenty of sunshine. yesterday we had the dizzy heights of 17 degrees in london. today it will be warmer. rain first thing this morning across parts of scotland, drizzly its across parts of england and some dense fog across england in particular, especially central and southern england heading towards the south—west. when that lives we are looking at a nice day, sunny and mostly die. an outside chance you could catch a shower in the south—east and temperatures up to 20 degrees, possibly 21. as i
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mentioned, cooler along the coast with an onshore flow. tree pollen prevalent today and it is hard today across prevalent today and it is hard today a cross m ost prevalent today and it is hard today across most of england and all of wales and around the strathclyde area. a lot of clear skies. cloud coming in from the north sea. we can have some drizzle into that as well. no problems with the temperatures. the lows between six and nine degrees. the wind direction is changing so instead of the cool east to north—easterly, we will be pulling in a south—easterly from the continent and you can see the track coming across our shores as illustrated by the yellows and ambers. as we start the day on thursday, some mist and fog to get rid of first of all. we are then looking at a dry day and a sunny day. if any cloud comes around,
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isolated chance of a shower. but we could hit 20—21. for good friday, once again, if there is any mist and fog, it will lift leaving a dry and sunny day. some cloud bubbling up as temperatures rise. italy 21 in london and edinburgh. possibly even a lot higher. as we had on to saturday, we see the temperatures climb. somewhere close to london could hit 24, possibly even 25. if you look across the board, temperatures on saturday are above average for the time of year and some will be a little bit higher. the weather front coming in as we had closer to the weekend and it will introduce cloud for the northern half of the country. still
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closer to average and we hold on to the milder conditions even to the south east. i think ithink nina i think nina has gone early, what is happening? what is happening? with holiday season fast approaching, many of us will be booking time away. but what if you have to cancel at the last minute? we've sent nina to the beach to find out your rights. that's right. the sun is out here on the costa del salford. i'm actuallyjust in the corner of the studio. but i'm here to talk about something serious. we all love our holidays, but sometimes you just can't make those long—awaited trips. a study a few years back estimated almost one in four of us. when we have to cancel, it isn't always clear what we're entitled to when it comes to refunds. today the competitions and markets authority — which regulates how
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companies operate — has launched a new campaign, asking holiday providers to be crystal clear with us about the rules. nearly 90% of us think we should get all or part of our money back if we cancel and the company gets to re—sell our holiday. of 2)of those of us that have had to cancel a booking, a fifth think they have been treated unfairly. one study from a few years back estimated we might be spending more than a billion pounds every year on the costs associated with cancelling a holiday. )and why do we cancel? the top reasons are illness or injury, but work commitments and relationship breakups are also to blame. so where do we stand officially? martyn james is a consumer rights champion from the dispute website resolver which worked with the cma on this campaign. he joins me now to discuss this. we told you to make an effort with your costume. i am wearing my beach costu me your costume. i am wearing my beach costume but it's a bit early in the morning. we stand? i assume that if you cancel a holiday, it's tough luck. you lose all of your money. what are the rules? that's not a lwa ys what are the rules? that's not always the case. lots of hotels, you
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can book for free always the case. lots of hotels, you can book forfree but always the case. lots of hotels, you can book for free but the competition among its authority have been very clear that companies can charge you if you just want to cancel the holiday without a really good reason that those charges must be proportional in this kind of makes sense and they've also got to represent the actual cost to the firm. it's not always clear what that will be. if you think you've been treated unfairly, you should make a complaint and new guidance today makes it very clear about what those rules should be. i know sometimes with package holidays, it's different. new rules have kicked in. if you have a flight or hotel, that automatically becomes a package holiday and you get more rights. there are two organisations, i'm remembering. they will look at complaints for you. what if you genuinely can't travel? i was in a
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situation where there was a family bereavement in the airline com pletely bereavement in the airline completely refunded the price of the flight completely refunded the price of the flight but that's not across—the—board. flight but that's not across-the-board. it's not, no. a lot of this is down to the discretion of the company. getting a really good travel insurance policy and making sure that starts from the moment you actually first book the holiday. lots of people bit from the moment they go away but you've got to begin early on because if you do have to cancel, chances are you are more likely to get a refund. what if the firm goes bust in the meantime? if the firm goes bust, that is a real worry. it makes sense, there area real worry. it makes sense, there are a few things you can do. if you pay for it on a credit card, you got some protection is under the consumer credit act, you may be able to claim a refund. credit card bookings, package deals, give you a bit better insurance but it's not supposed to cost you any more than its cost the company. martin is
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going to hang around. we are going to have a beach cocktail. if you have any questions, and need to know the answer as to what you are entitled to, it is quite complicated. martin will be back in the next hour. she did it dutifully and elegantly. from revealing unknown emperor penguin colonies by the colour of their poo, to discovering mysterious ice rings — a new bbc documentary series hopes to tell the story of our planet as you've never seen it before. earth in space' uses cameras hundreds of kilometres up in the atmosphere, to explore some of the most remote habitats. let's take a look.
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from space, the view of our planet is breathtaking. satellites orbiting the earth can now look down on it in absolutely extraordinary detail. using cameras on the ground, in the year, in space. we can tell the story of life on earth from brand—new perspective. at a time when the earth ‘s surface is changing faster than any point in
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human history, we can seejust changing faster than any point in human history, we can see just what impact we are having. wow, that is amazing. )series producer chloe sarosh and director barney revill join us now. the footage is staggering. it's a real televisual game—changer. the footage is staggering. it's a real televisual game-changer. we hope so. we are really excited to show everyone, it's a brand—new thing, and we can't wait for people to see it. if you so many different satellites. trying to put that together. we are using satellite companies all over the world who are taking pick as of every sort of corner of the oath of adding given moment and we are able to ask for those pictures to be a can to help us those pictures to be a can to help us tell stories from the brand—new perspective so really exciting the
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results are good, we hope. tell us about penguin to. why is it important for the helping us find where they are? -- penguin poop. through satellite images, they were able to look around the antarctic which is pretty ridiculously impossible to get to at some points and what they realised is, penguin poop and what they realised is, penguin poopis and what they realised is, penguin poop is a slightly different colour to the rocks and ice in antarctica so to the rocks and ice in antarctica so if you are scanning, the route, they can find new colonies and they have doubled the number of emperor penguin colonies that are known aboutjust penguin colonies that are known about just through the use of satellite images. we've looked at so many different things, and these are gorgeous pictures. it's extraordinary watching it. the thing about the elephants, you are looking at some elephants, you look at these
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elements on the earth. and you said from space. how does it work? of course, high—resolution from space. how does it work? of course, high— resolution satellites can take images with 33 centimetre per pixel see coetzee house, car, trees. can we see an element. —— elephant? a5 trees. can we see an element. —— elephant? as long as you can tell us where they are going to be at a specific day. i spent some time—out there with these elephants. we filmed these families and found them. we predicted where they are going to be and hit the button on and off they went. it's a wonderful sequence and off they went. it's a wonderful sequence with these elephants. by seeing the satellite pictures, you can almost see into the future so you know these elephants, where they are, and they were in a bit of trouble. because you can see the satellite and what's coming, they might be ok. every morning, you use
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the satellites. we have this almost weird thing where we can see where the elephants are. we knew exactly what was going to happen. it was quite incredible. the context of where these animals live. this is satellite footage of the amazon. sometimes, huge areas. as we made the series, not only can we take pictures from satellites, there was an amazing back catalogue of satellite pictures. we used images over ten yea rs satellite pictures. we used images over ten years to timelapse them. you can actually see this, it's
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really beautiful. one thing i wanted to ask you about was waste. we got some incredible pictures of the amount of stuff that we could throw away. we can see the good points and the bad but some are incredibly beautiful. these are one of these biggerfields where beautiful. these are one of these bigger fields where these aeroplanes that no longer use the decommissioned parts are laid out and reused but there is some incredible images from around the world and what's lovely about it is you really get the sense of the whole planet in the context of everything and also just a small and fragile it is. i know you talk in a programme about human impact. you are back here in a couple of hours time? have first, have a cup of tea and come back later. will try and
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get those satellite pictures of penguin pooh because i think our brea kfast viewers penguin pooh because i think our breakfast viewers need to see that while they are enjoying their copy. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. john maguire's at york cathedral, which was heavily damaged by fire 35 years ago, to see how lessons learned there, could help rebuild notre—dame. good morning. 1984, july, 1984, talking about when the buyer here at york minster started. it was most likely a night expect lightning strike that hit the apex of the roof and put a hole through the roof. all of this was destroyed in the firefighters who came and tackled the braise expect ladies had to tackle the roof down to preserve the rest of the cathedral. it then took a few years, three years to reconstruct, to renovate, to repair this fantastic building. roughly the same sort of sizes notre dame. you
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can imagine the same sort of challenge will be faced by the french. what lessons can they learn here from york? we will talk about them later on in the programme after them later on in the programme after the news, travel, and weather where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor, sadiq khan, says he's "extremely concerned" about plans for climate change activists to target tube services today. nearly 300 people have been arrested over two days of action by the group extinction rebellion which has seen roads blocked in central london. retailers claim they've lost 10 million pounds in trade and are concerned for staff and customers. we're 150,000 staff that work here, trhey‘re struggling to get in. already some of our stores have reported 25% down in sales. obviously retail is going through quite a difficult period at the moment, so it's hugely disruptive, so we really call on the mayor and the met to grip this, get control and stop the disruption in the west end.
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extinction rebellion has apologised for disruption but says it believes that the protests are necessary to bring about action on climate change. today marks the 20th anniversary of the brixton market nail bombing. it was the first of three nail bomb attacks over two weeks in london targeting the capital's black, bangladeshi and gay communities other devices exploded in brick lane and the admiral duncan pub in soho. three people were killed and a hundred and forty others injured. a charity set up to help sick babies and mothers is hoping to change attitudes towards donating breast milk. the hearts milk bank is an independent service — which delivers to 15 neonatal units in london and seriously ill mums. its founders say they want to highlight that donating breast milk can save lives and change negative perceptions. let‘s start with the tube— and as you heard commuters have been warned there could be disruption today because of planned action by climate change activists at the moment there are minor delays
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on the district line between tower hill and earl's court because of a signal failure. if we take a look at waterloo bridge that's still blocked as part of that protest. oxford circus and marble arch are also blocked. and in kings cross, euston road is down to two lanes outside st pancras station and down to one lane at the junction with pentonville road for works. good morning. there may be a little bit of mistiness out there this morning. it's not widespread but you may get a patch or two to the west and south of london, anywhere really, but it will lift to a day of warm sunshine. day by day this week, the temperature is steadily rising, thanks to the high pressure. a gentle easterly, south—easterly breezes so perhaps a little bit cooler out towards the essex coast. elsewhere, though, it is starting to feel pretty warm. some cloud bubbling up into the afternoon and temperatures reaching 20 celsius in central london. like i said, further towards the east, it's likely to feel a little cooler. now, overnight tonight, again, clear skies, temperatures not dropping too far thanks to the heat generated during the day. so not as cold as the last
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couple of nights. 7—8 celsius, the minimum temperature. as we head into thursday, more sunshine. look at the outlook. lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head closer to the easter weekend. temperatures in the low 20s by saturday. we could even see 24 or 25 celsius. that‘s all for now— there'll be more updates from us across our breakfast bulletins of course and you can take a look at our website at the ususal dadress bbc.co.uk/london for more news travel and weather.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: thirty minutes from destruction — firefighters are praised for risking their lives to save notre—dame cathedral. solidarity along the seine. last night hundreds of parisians turned out for a candlelit vigil to pay homage to the 850—year—old gothic structure. extra time for new mums and dads, campaigners call on the government to extend parental leave forfamilies with premature babies. avoiding double holiday heartache — if you have to cancel your trip unexpectedly, what are your refund rights? why are there calls for stronger regulation? in sport, it gets "messi" for manchester united. no nou camp fairytale for ole gunnar solskjaer as his side are knocked out of the champions league by a brilliant barcelona. the view of earth from space, we'll find out how the team behind bbc one's latest documentary series captured these stunning shots.
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some dense fog to watch out for, particularly across england. for most of us today it is going to be dry and sunny and over the next few days it will get warmer. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday 17th of april. our top story: thank you for being with us this morning. firefighters have been praised for risking their lives to save notre—dame cathedral, as it's revealed the historic building came within minutes of being completely destroyed. more than half a billion pounds has now been pledged to help fund the restoration, which president macron has promised will be completed within five years. but some architects warn his plans are too optimistic. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. chamber music playing. hundreds joined together for a vigil on the banks of the seine last night to show solidarity in the face of this most unexpected of traumas.
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they sang hymns and said prayers and paid tribute to the courage of those who worked so hard to save this world famous landmark. inside the 850—year—old cathedral, the damage is now on display for all to see. the fire took hold of the ancient building's roof, burning through hundreds of tons of oak injust a few hours, raining ashen and embers onto the floor below raining ash and embers onto the floor below and toppling the famous spire. 500 firefighters battled for four hours before managing to get the blaze under control. another 30 minutes and the story would have been one of complete destruction — something paris would have found difficult to bear. though the stone structure is still standing, there has been significant loss. as well as most of the roof, it's estimated between 5% and 10% of the precious artworks housed in the cathedral have gone.
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but the crown of thorns, some believe was warned byjesus on the cross, several important paintings, the mediaeval organ and the famous rose windows remain, and this most historic of buildings will be repaired. translation: yes, we will rebuild the notre—dame cathedral and it will be more beautiful than before and it will be done in five years. hundreds of millions of euros have already been pledged to that cause. notre—dame has survived but it is been badly scarred. thoughts now turn to what will be one of the world's most important restoration projects. kathryn stanczyszen, bbc news. universities are being accused of using gagging orders to stop bullying, discrimination and sexual misconduct allegations becoming public. dozens of academics have told the bbc they were "harassed" out of theirjobs and made to sign non—disclosure agreements after making complaints. figures show uk universities have spent at least £87m on payoffs since 2017.
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rianna croxford reports. i have been bullied for six years across two universities by the same man. once designed to protect trade secrets, now creating a culture of silence, nondisclosure agreements are keeping allegations of misconduct in the dark. feeling trapped but desperate to be heard. after i complained i was advised to sign a nda and leave. after i complained i was advised to sign an nda and leave. i ended up hundreds of milesaway at a new university, only for the bully to follow me and continue his harassment. i'm depressed and it's cripling my career. the bbc has spoken to dozens of people who say they felt pressurized into signing an nda. many have faced racist and sexist bullying. others describe being groped and harassed. one woman said she was disciplined for not being at work on the day of her miscarriage. and this academic has decided to break her nda.
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it's actually been super helpful. she signed one during ongoing grievances relating to her disabilities, teaching and research role, particularly following her cancer diagnosis, that she felt had not been failry addressed. i want to break my nda because i want to encourage people to break theirs because we cannot see each other and therefore we can't make a community. the university of liverpool said... the government is trying to tighten the rules on what nda's are used for. these women hope breaking their silence will stop them being misused. rianna croxford, bbc news. the metropolitan police say they've now arrested nearly 300 people involved in climate change protests in london. the demonstrations have led to road closures, traffic jams and disruption to bus services,
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affecting more than 500,000 commuters. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has urged the protesters not to go ahead with plans to try to disrupt tube services. mums—to—be should be routinely offered an ultrasound scan at 36—weeks, to help stop risky breech deliveries, when a baby's bottom orfeet emerge first. researchers from the university of cambridge, say the extra scans would avoid 4000 emergency caesareans and eight baby deaths a year in england. currently, midwives and doctors tend to rely on the shape and feel of the mother's bump to check. the president of ecuador has made renewed allegations about the behaviour of the wikileaks founder, julian assange, during his seven year stay at the ecuadorean embassy in london. lenin moreno told the bbc that he withdrew mr assange's asylum, after repeated incidences of unacceptable behaviour, which he says broke their agreement. eating even moderate amounts of ham, bacon and red meat is linked
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to an increased risk of bowel cancer, according to new research. the study, led by oxford university, found that those who stuck to the nhs guideline of eating about 70—grammes of red or processed meat a day, that's a slice of roast beef and a rasher of bacon, still increased their risk of bowel cancer by a fifth compared to those who ate very small amounts. for people who are looking to reduce the risk of cancer then the advice is the less you eat the lower the risk. this does not mean that you have to completely give up bacon or go vegetarian if you do not want to but simple ways that you can cut down on the amount you are eating can all make a big difference in your risk of bowel cancer. british workers put in the longest hours of any country in the european union, according to a study by the tuc. the trade union says full—time employees in the uk average 42 hours a week — almost two more than a typical eu worker.
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it says workers in countries such as germany and denmark, are more productive than their uk counterparts, despite working fewer hours. a dog found swimming 135—miles off the coast of thailand is now back on dry land. 135 miles! that is a long way. "boon—rod" — which means "the saved one" — found by the crew of an oil tanker in the middle of the gulf of thailand. they believe he may have fallen off a fishing boat. he's said to be recovering well and a new home has already been lined up. a lucky escape. half—an—hour — that's how close notre—dame came to being totally destroyed, according to a french government minister. last night, president macron addressed the nation and vowed to restore the cathedral within five years. more than half—a—billion pounds has
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already been pledged by people wanting to help. we still don't know the cause of the fire, but the cathedral had been undergoing renovation work. the flames appear to have started beneath the main spire, quickly spreading along the timber roof, and towards the towers. just over an hour later, part of the famous spire collapsed. despite the damage, the main stone structure of the building appears to have been saved. president macron saying this can be rebuilt in five years... can you hear me? i do not think he can. anyway... hopefully we will go back to him a little bit later. we are also speaking to sylvain waserman is vice—president
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of the french national assembly and joins us from strasbourg. also we havejohn maguire and talking about how there is usually a minimum of ten years to repair notre—dame and yet president macron wa nts notre—dame and yet president macron wants it ready for the 2024 olympics. do you do it the way it was? do you use avoid. we do know not the answers to that but we know it is time for the headlines: we will rebuild. president macron of france vows to restore notre dame cathedral to its former glory within 5 years.( forfamilies with premature babies.
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if you want to get in touch about amateur babies and extended leave, get in touch. do get in contact with us get in touch. do get in contact with us about that and i am sure we will get a few e—mails and you can find us on get a few e—mails and you can find us on social media as well. almost £600 million has been pledged to help notre—dame rebuild after monday's massive fire. what exactly will that restoration involved. 35 yea rs will that restoration involved. 35 years ago, how did westminster do it? they will never forget and the programme of refurbishment of a 13th
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century building just like notre—dame is ongoing, remarkable similarities between york minster and notre—dame. this is not fire damaged, obviously just to and notre—dame. this is not fire damaged, obviouslyjust to have a look at some of the incredible craftwork that still takes place in the cathedral even to this day. this isa the cathedral even to this day. this is a recently restored pinnacle, the first to be restored on an 11 year project. this is made of magnesium limestone, the same stone originally built and sourced from the same quarry. depicting the story of king solomon. this is one of his wives, holding the baby. this was carved one of our masons in our workshop. let's remind you of what the fire look like back in 1984. as we wander around to get closer to the roof.
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obviously, the roof has been restored and replaced. once again, covered in lead at the time. when you stand here, it is difficult to imagine what the fire must have been like and what fighting it must‘ve been like. of course, it was an intense fire and the decision was taken as it was spreading down towards the tire to pull the roof down. had it continued the central tower acted as a chimney. that stopped the fire spreading. 35 years ago, to logic not what it is today. one of the firefighters was suspended by a line and had to leap off the side of the building... as the roof collapse. a couple of things worth pointing out, you have patches and updated fire protection systems. but you also had fire protection system installed in the
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second world war. after the bombing of cove ntry second world war. after the bombing of coventry we had a water tank installed in the ansbach so we had our own independent water supply. —— kings park. fire compartments in the roof and throughout the building to stop fire spreading. if they come calling, what advice would you offer them? they will be asking many questions, do they put modern material in. i am sure they would like to replace like for like. we have been through this so we would be happy to advise and our team, a lot of them worked on this restoration. these buildings were constructed in the 13th century and they thought about things like fire then. is it sensible to replace like
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for like? a building like this, we are always as true to the building. the methods we use now are exactly as the masons and joiners using the 14th century. thank you very much indeed. absolutely fascinating to be here at york minster this morning. they run tours on friday afternoons here so you can come up and see it. great to see that work as well. we will be down to the stonemasons yard later to see how they carve those extraordinary figures. it's wednesday morning, let's find out about the weather. if you like a bit of sun, it's looking good.
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especially on good friday, wall—to—wall blue skies but today, a bit of fog to start with, more on that in just bit of fog to start with, more on that injust a bit of fog to start with, more on that in just a second. over the next few days, it's going to continue a bit warmer. rain across parts of scotla nd bit warmer. rain across parts of scotland and parts of the uk and dense fog. and that will lift, the sun will come out for most. it will be breezy along the north sea coastlines temperatures will be bit lower. the breeze picking up. today's top temperature, likely to be about 20 degrees. that is way above average for this stage in april. pollen levels are going to be high as well. if you have an allergy to tree pollen, do bear that in mind. through this evening and overnight, you will notice more cloud coming in from the north sea. there will be coastal mists until fog and a lot of clear skies and still quite a breezy night.
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temperature not particularly low. that is largely because the wind direction is changing. it's changing tomorrow for south—easterly and you can see how we are pulling on this warm airfrom the can see how we are pulling on this warm air from the continent across our shores. and so the next few days, temperatures will continue to rise. the first thing on thursday morning, mist and fog to get rid of. when it lifts, we're looking at a fair bit of sunshine and a noticeable breeze as well. a bit cooler on the coasts then it's likely to be inland but highs of 20, 21, quite possible for example in the midlands and parts of north—west england. for good friday, still some mist and fog to get rid of. there will be a lot of dry and sunny weathered. temperatures only on the upward. 21 in edinburgh, 22 in
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cardiff, possibly a bit higher. a lot of dry weather around, a lot of sunshine as well. you can see a weather front is coming across parts western scotland and northern ireland. that's going to have an adverse effect on the temperatures, having said that, we're still looking at good temperatures this stage in april. as we push further south into all that sunshine, we are still going to be about 23, 24 or 25 for some. easter sunday, the weak weather front producing a bit more cloud, the odd of light rain or drizzle, behind it, fresher conditions, temperatures bang on across north—west scotland and still mild in the south. still a lot of uncertainty about this but the bank holiday monday, easter monday, we mightjust have this weather front coming our way, introducing some rain. the timing and the positions could change so do keep tuned the forecast.
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carol, lovely bank holiday weekend news. she is in control of a lot, carol kirkwood, you know that? the streaming service netflix attracted a record number of new subscribers in the first three months of this year. nina's been taking a look at their latest results. lots of subscribers the share price is done something funny. in terms of new subscriptions, the best three months ever. 9.6 million new subscribers up to march taking it globally to 150 million, a lot of pyjama time. that success has been down to original content, they invest billions every year on their own stuff, things like the crown, stranger things, 0a and there is being a question that investing that much might affect profit margins but they had to keep prices up in order to keep making their own material.
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towards the end of the year, we will see apple streaming and disney enter the market they start with an advantage, disney have that huge back catalogue, the star wars series, all the disney classics like aladdin, beauty and the beast. they promised our prices will be a little bit cheaper than netflix but netflix today will be delighted, their places a global powerhouse is com pletely places a global powerhouse is completely confirmed. quality up, prices down. we like that. the front pages all dominated by pictures of notre dame. inside, quite interesting stories. somebody‘s trying to sell a t rex skeleton for... where do you find one? a maverick fossil hunter has
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angered palaeontologists by offering angered palaeontologists by offering a juvenile to allosaurus rex on ebay, selling it for £2.2 million but palaeontologists are saying you can't do this, and it would be a catastrophic loss to science because palaeontologists refused to study private collections because they can't guarantee the work. you are out pricing museums and other places, trying to sell it to a private letter. it's a lot of money for a dinosaur. one of my favourite things about going to the wonderful cou nty of things about going to the wonderful county of cornwall is apart from the stunning scenery and beautiful waves, the fish and chips. what else cani waves, the fish and chips. what else can i mention? some parts of it, the beaches, you don't get any mobile phone coverage which for me is a bonus. that's going to change. a telephone company is going to install small antennas on the roofs
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of phone boxes because there are still phone boxes in some of the car parks that are going to put antenna in there in the resorts of pulse south and sennen cove which will preside —— provide beach—goers beach—goers with coverage. understand people might want to have coverage but one of myjoys of going there is that there is no coverage. women hang onto £500 worth of old clothes. aren't you on no buying spree? it might sound hard to lots of people, since we interviewed liz bondin of people, since we interviewed liz bond in on debris 20th and i said, i'm not going to buy any new clothes. i have been shopping in my wardrobe. it's been an education.
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how kind of obsessive it was. i've been looking all the time. also, yes... your leather skirt today. it's been there a little while. when lent is over, i might go back to the shops. the other end of it is, in thisjob, i shops. the other end of it is, in this job, i can shops. the other end of it is, in thisjob, i can literally wear the same suit three days in a row and no—one cares. if you want the same suit, you would get grief for it. it's annoying and wrong but for some people, understandable. this is durdle door in dorset. this unnamed 28—year—old man climbed to the top to ta ke 28—year—old man climbed to the top to take a selfie and it led to a coastguard alert. it was only wearing jeans and trainers and the
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whole point of this was, thrillseeker wrists his own life to ta ke thrillseeker wrists his own life to take selfie at the seaside so don't be daft is the message from the coastguard. this programme, the other from coastguard. this programme, the otherfrom space, coastguard. this programme, the other from space, they've taken various different pictures and finding extraordinary things. , colouring —— colonies of penguins. mike is going to be had throughout the morning to talk about sport.|j know manchester united fans are not wanting to relive last night, not the best night in barcelona. manchester united very much outclassed. manchester united's best
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player, david de gea, a low moment, well beaten but on the other side, ajax in the champions league are bucking the trend. young players playing a lovely style on they beat juventus last night. as well as the negatives, there are positives. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. how many stars can you see in the sky at night? a new survey says many of us only see a small number because of light pollution. we'll be looking at the campaign hoping to change that, just before eight. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london
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news, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor, sadiq khan, says he's "extremely concerned" about plans for climate change activists to target tube services today. nearly 300 people have been arrested over two days of action by the group extinction rebellion which has seen roads blocked in central london. retailers claim they've lost 10 million pounds in trade and are concerned for staff and customers. we're150,000 staff that work here, trhey‘re struggling to get in. already some of our stores have reported 25% down in sales. obviously retail is going through quite a difficult period at the moment, so it's hugely disruptive, so we really call on the mayor and the met to grip this, get control and stop the disruption in the west end. extinction rebellion has apologised for disruption but says it believes that the protests are necessary to bring about action on climate change. today marks the 20th anniversary of the brixton market nail bombing. it was the first of three nail bomb attacks over two weeks in london targeting the capital's black, bangladeshi and gay communities— other devices exploded in brick lane and the admiral duncan pub in soho.
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three people were killed and 140 others injured. a charity set up to help sick babies and mothers is hoping to change attitudes towards donating breast milk. the hearts milk bank is an independent service which delivers to 15 neonatal units in london and seriously ill mums. its founders say they want to highlight that donating breast milk can save lives and change negative perceptions. let's take a look at the travel situation now. let's start with the tube and as you heard commuters have been warned there could be disruption today because of planned action by climate change activists — at the moment there are some unrelated minor delays clockwise on the circle line and also on the district line between tower hill and earl's court. if we take a look at waterloo bridge that's still blocked as part of that protest. oxford circus and marble arch are also blocked. and in kings cross, euston road is down to two lanes outside st pancras station for works. now the weather with kate kinsella.
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there may be a little bit of mistiness out there this morning. it's not widespread but you may get a patch or two to the west and south of london, anywhere really, but it will lift to a day of warm sunshine. day by day this week, the temperature is steadily rising, thanks to the high pressure. a gentle easterly, south—easterly breeze so perhaps a little bit cooler out towards the essex coast. elsewhere, though, it is starting to feel pretty warm. some cloud bubbling up into the afternoon and temperatures reaching 20 celsius in central london. like i said, further towards the east, it's likely to feel a little cooler. now, overnight tonight, again, clear skies, temperatures not dropping too far thanks to the heat generated during the day. so not as cold as the last couple of nights. 7—8 celsius, the minimum temperature. as we head into thursday, more sunshine. look at the outlook. lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head closer to the easter weekend. temperatures in the low 20s by saturday.
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maybe 24 or 25 celsius. that's all for now — there'll be more updates from us across our breakfast bulletins of course and you can take a look at our website at the ususal address for more news travel and weather. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: firefighters have been praised for risking their lives to save notre—dame, as it's revealed the historic building came within minutes of being completely destroyed. more than half a billion pounds has now been pledged to help fund the restoration, which president macron has promised will be completed within five years. but some architects warn his plans are too optimistic. this is the scene in paris this morning, it looks like a beautiful morning. where the police and fire services will spend today and tomorrow assessing security and safety at notre dame cathedral. our paris correspondent, hugh schofield joins us now.
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president macron has got ambitious plans? he wants it completed by the 2024 olympic games. that was the central point of the televised address. he is trying to capitalise on the huge outpouring of good will in the country and around the world. as he was saying, it is ambitious and there are plenty of people end of the world of restoration and renovation who were saying not to be over hasty. this will take the time it takes. it is an enormous programme which will be in three phases. one is to stabilise and dry the building, making sure it is safe. then a long period of assessment, going around every part of the building, the stonework, the roof, and seeing what needs to be
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done. that will take a long time. and then the work itself. the key question is to what extent do you renovate? do you replace or put new material in there? do they go back to the old idea, the craftsmen, the oak to the old idea, the craftsmen, the oa k forests to the old idea, the craftsmen, the oak forests which formed the roof beams. it looks like a beautiful morning as well. thank you. uk universities have spent at least £87m on payoffs with non—disclosure agreements since 2017. they're accused of using "gagging orders" to stop bullying, discrimination and sexual misconduct allegations becoming public. dozens of academics have told the bbc they were harassed out of theirjobs and made to sign non—disclosure agreements after making complaints. the metropolitan police say they've now arrested nearly three hundred people involved in climate change protests in london.
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the demonstrations have led to road closures, trafficjams and disruption to bus services, affecting more than 500,000 commuters. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has urged the protesters not to go ahead with plans to try to disrupt tube services. the president of ecuador has made renewed allegations about the behaviour of the wikileaks founder, julian assange, during his seven year stay at the ecuadorean embassy in london. lenin moreno told the bbc that he withdrew mr assange's asylum, after repeated incidences of unacceptable behaviour, which he says broke their agreement. eating even moderate amounts of ham, bacon and red meat is linked to an increased risk of bowel cancer, according to new research. the study, led by oxford university, found that those who stuck to the nhs guideline of eating about 70—grammes of red or processed meat a day, that's a slice of roast beef and a rasher of bacon, still increased their risk of bowel cancer by a fifth compared to those
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who ate very small amounts. british workers put in the longest hours of any country in the european union, according to a study by the tuc. the trade union says full—time employees in the uk average 42 hours a week — almost two more than a typical eu worker. it says workers in countries such as germany and denmark, are more productive than their uk counterparts, despite working fewer hours. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather. a very good friday. did she say 25 somewhere? what! even more of a suntan for you. i will all factor 30 except on the lives and they are a bit sore. it is painful when you
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talk. smile for the pain. reflecting on manchester united except from europe. ole gunnar solskjaer 20 years on from his heroics against barcelona for bayern munich. but there was no repeat. it's all over for manchester united in the champions league, blown away by barcelona, at the nou camp — as natalie pirks reports. they said they were here for the love not the glory. it was just as well. fun in the sun would soon turn cold. barcelona's arrogance would be justified, but first united almost crashed the party. marcus rashford smashing the crossbar inside the first minute. united's flame was soon extinguished though and things were about to get "messi". that was lionel 23rd goal against english teams. his 24th came courtesy of a collector's item.
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david de gea, often united's saviour, could only look on in horror as messi's shot wriggling under him. remarkably, it was to get worse. ex liverpool player, philippe coutinho, with the pick of the bunch. what a way to silence his critics. alexis sanchez almost pulled off a consolation in his old hunting ground but the night belonged to one man, this mesmerising magician — doesn't it always? natalie pirks, bbc news at camp nou. so barcelona through to the last four, and they'll be joined by ajax who beat the italian champions juventus to go through in turin. after knocking out champions real madrid in the last round, they upset the odds once again. matthias, de licked, with the winner — he's the captain of this side, atjust 19 years of age. brilliant result for a, historically huge club, in european football, this is their first semi final, since 1997. there will be at least one english team,
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in the semi—finals. tottenham go to manchester city tonight, looking to preserve the 1—0 lead, they have from last week's, first leg. this could be a make or break week, for city, as they continue their pursuit of the quadruple. they face spurs again, in the premier league on saturday. liverpool meanwhile, have one foot in the last four. they lead their quarter—final tie, with porto 2—0, ahead of tonight's second leg. bossjurgen klopp says his side are confident, and are going to portugal to win. in the words of their manager, cardiff city are alive and kicking, in the premier league after beating brighton 2—0. realistically one of these two sides, is likely to be relegated, so this was a huge win for cardiff. it takes them to within two points of brighton in that race to stay up, and gives neil warnock‘s side hope,with four games left to go. everybody knew how big it is. we could knew we'd be relegated really if we lose the game today. we're not going to catch up eight points on anybody at this level, so itjust makes it interesting, really, doesn't it.
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we do not give up and, like i said, i thought we scored two good goals and we played some good stuff as well. we heard quite a few pundits today saying it would be ourfinal game in the premier league but we are alive and kicking. i love his passion. there's some doubt over anthonyjoshua's next big fight. he's due to fight jarrell miller in new york, on june 1st, but promoter eddie hearn has confirmed that miller, has provided an adverse sample to anti—doping authorites. miller's promoter says they're waiting for more information about the failed test. ireland's katie taylor, is due to fight on that undercard. she'll fight belgium's, delfine persoon, and if she wins, she'll become the undisputed lightweight world champion. now england announce their squad for the cricket world cup later today, and there could be a controversial new call up. this isjoffra archer, taking a wicket in the ipl yesterday. archer's a bowler, who was born in barbados, but his father is english and archer himself qualifies for england,
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under the ecb's new residency rules. but one team mate, says it's a tricky decision for the selectors. selection is part and parcel of the game and the job that we do so "fair" is probably not the right word. you know, it probably wouldn't be fair morally but, at the same time, it is the nature of international sport and if someone was to miss out it would be incredibly unlucky but it is down to the selectors. the australian rugby player, israel falau, is going to challenge his sacking, over a homophobic post on social media. rugby australia, cancelled his contract, after folau said that "hell awaits" gay people. the post remains online and at the weekend, the 30—year—old said he was standing by "what the bible says". one man who's supported folau, is the england forward billy vunipola. he got a formal warning from the rugby football union yesterday, but his club saracens say they'll stand by him and want to move on.
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and finally we've got some racket smashing for you. this is novak djokovic, in monte carlo, as he prepares for the french open, but the world number one, totally lost it when he gave away a service game. he did go onto beat philipp kohlschreiber. he actually won this game. he said it was a tough start. he also threw a racquet into the crowd. he made a whole in the moring. how many did he throw! it just whole in the moring. how many did he throw! itjust shows how high his standards. just the start of the season but he has done this before a couple of times. i think it is just high standards but he got a ticking off for a code violation but no points taken off. i have been criticised for not being competitive enough. who could afford to smash a
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racquet! parents of premature babies should be allowed extra parental leave, according to campaigners. at the moment, leave is at the discretion of employers, and many parents face going back to work, whilejuggling on—going medical appointments. to mark neonatal mental health awareness week, rachel burden has been looking at the issues. every year, tens of thousands of premature babies are born in the uk. some mothers this could mean weeks in hospital alongside their baby. change nappies, feed her, i would stay till about four. come back in the evening. meanwhile, maternity leave has started and it is slowly slipping away. i am not home with my baby. there are mothers at home
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doing normal things but i am coming into hospital doing this. i will back to work before she sits down properly. it is not fair. decides and sounds remind me so much of my time ina and sounds remind me so much of my time in a unit so much with my little boy who was born nine weeks early and weighed just £3. it is a really stressed time. even if your focus on your little one, in the back of your mind you're also weighing up the potentialfinancial impact. some organisations are beginning to change their parental leave policy. michelle had triplets weeks of weighing less than £2 each. you think, is start doing the calculations and by the time i go back to work, they will be really young and then you start thinking about, i have lost out on this and
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start thinking about your finances and how am i going to cope? will i have to leave my employment? how am i going to support myself and them. her employers, council, were one of the to extend maternity. having that reassurance and building that stability is a huge help and a huge difference. other organisations are beginning to follow their lead, including the bbc. one mother has been driving this change. we have been driving this change. we have been campaigning for some time asking governments to make this change for families whose babies are born premature. the guidelines do not go far enough. we need to make sure all parents who find themselves in the intensive care unit have the additional time they need. the government says it is reviewing pa rental government says it is reviewing parental rights of premature babies.
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meanwhile, for these families, it is a case of taking one tiny step at a time. we're joined from glasgow by the mp david linden, who is the chair of the all party parliamentary group on premature & sick babies. his daughter was born prematurely last year. just tell us a little bit about your just tell us a little bit about your children. you have experienced this. my children. you have experienced this. my daughter is seven months old today and both my children were born premature, one in 2015 and one last year. in both those cases, we knew they were going to be premature as a result of a diabetic agency. the reality was, when you went to the neonatal unit, you have to try and support your families. in neonatal unit, you have to try and support yourfamilies. in both of those occasions, i was aware as a dad, you get two weeks off work and at the moment, the uk lawjust doesn't keep up with the times, doesn't keep up with the times, doesn't recognise that families, life begins in the neonatal unit.
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life can begin an incubator in the uk law doesn't take that into account is what i'm looking for is the government to make a minor adjustment to employment law to make sure we support. for example, as you mentioned. the bbc is one of the latest employers. you are not thinking about your work situation. focusing on supporting your family. the idea that your parent would be phoning up your employer to sort this out, while their son or daughters are struggling for breath in an incubator, it is risible in 2019 so i'm looking for the government to say, for every day or week that you spend on the neonatal
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unit, we will add that want your pa rental leave, unit, we will add that want your parental leave, that seems like a sensible way move forward. there is cross— party sensible way move forward. there is cross—party support in westminster. you mention that you knew the babies we re you mention that you knew the babies were going to be born early but for many of these parents it comes as a big shock, can't it? absolutely, first time around, we knew we were going to have an early can see. my son was meant to be induced. we didn't realised he was going into neonatal care so the reality is, is brought out through cesarean section and then put into an intensive care unitand and then put into an intensive care unit and that's an incredibly high pressured environment and at the moment, ijust don't pressured environment and at the moment, i just don't think that uk legislation takes into account the fa ct legislation takes into account the fact that parents have to go through this. it's a relatively small change thatis this. it's a relatively small change that is required. i'm hoping it will do that for us. you mentioned two
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weeks of maternity leave, that can hardly cover it. if you have a child in that hospital at that point. what about your wife, did she feel pressure that she has to get back to work? my wife is very fortunate and she is a primary school teacher. that time, she won't get that back. she will get 11 months at home. just david, thank you very much for talking to us. a government spokesperson recognises that having a premature baby can be an incredibly difficult time. i know that some people, theyjudge
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carroll's weather at about quarter to eight and its off to work on the school run. some people are on holiday. if you like it's sunny and you are not after rain, you in luck for the next few days. there is going to be above sunshine around. at the moment, we still have rain across northern scott, and also week when the front with the odd spot of drizzle. distant fog across england and wales, particularly dense across parts of the south but that will lift and there will be a lot of sunshine and those are temperature values. ranging from ten to about 20, maybe 21. a keen breeze coming off the north sea. temperature is a bit lower on the north sea coast and temperatures will pick up across south—west england and the channel islands. this evening and overnight, a lot of clear skies and all this
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cloud coming in from the north sea. coastal mist and fog and some hill fog but no problems with the temperatures. it's not going to be particularly cold because the wind direction is changing. it's coming from the south—east, from the continent, pulling all this milder our across our shores, hence the temperature is continuing to climb. first thing on thursday morning, emily mr hogg will lift and we're looking at a largely dry day. a fair bit sunshine around. quite breezy as well, temperatures ranging from ten in lerwick to hies about 20, 21. possibly two degrees across parts of north—west england. we start with mist and fog patches. reasonable will fall lighter and lengthy spells of sunshine. hardly a cloud in sight. the temperature reflecting
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that. 21 degrees in edinburgh, excuse me, 22 degrees in glasgow. once again, we're looking at cardiff getting up to 22 saturday, any missed in hogg will lift quickly. we do have a weak weather front coming in across scotland and northern ireland. that will introduce a bit more cloud and a fresher feel, with temperatures back down to 12 degrees. it's still good in stornoway but in the sunshine, eyes of about 23. the weather front moves southwards, and with cloud, any patchy light rain and drizzle. it brightens up but it will be fresher. ahead of it in the sunshine, highs of up to 22 or 23. or easter monday, this could change. things turned a
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little bit more unsettled but there isa little bit more unsettled but there is a lot of uncertainty around this. you need a cup of tea, tarot —— carole, you need a cup of tea, tarot —— ca role, after you need a cup of tea, tarot —— carole, after yesterday. my mouth is so dry. carol, thank you for getting to it. with that weather change, you might need a pair of sunglasses. holiday season is fast approaching. it seems like one of us is on holiday all the time stop with that weather forecast, you needn't holiday all the time stop with that weatherforecast, you needn't go abroad. the sun is out here on the costa del salford. alright. i'm actuallyjust in the corner of the studio. but i'm here to talk about something serious. because when we have to cancel our treasured holidays it can be heartbraking, but it isn't always clear if we're entitiled to money back. so today the competitions and markets authority which regulates companies is asking holiday providers to be crystal clear with us
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about the rules. the cma found nearly 90 percent of us think we should get all or part of our money back if we cancel and the company gets to re—sell our holiday. of those of us that have had to cancel a booking, a fifth think they have been treated ufairly and one study from a few years back estimated we might be spending more than a billion pounds every year on the costs associated with cancelling a holiday. why do we cancel? the top reasons are illness or injury, but work commitments and relationship breakups are also to blame. what a nightmare, booking a holiday than splitting up. nice sunglasses! martyn james is a consumer rights champion from the dispute website resolver which worked with the cma on this campaign. he joins me now to discuss this. this is quite interesting. my assumption was, if you cancel your
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holiday, tough luck. we stand? lots of people make this assumption and it doesn't always work out that way. if you have to pay deposit as the competition and markets authority of said, the rules need to be clear about how big it is, whether it's it's a proportion of the cost. it also has to be highlighted to you. and if those things don't apply, you can makea and if those things don't apply, you can make a complaint. is it different for package holidays. you do have a lot more protection. certain amount of protections if there is a problem. poor old nathan from twitter is due to fly out for a wedding. if you're clicking on line and getting the wrong dates. he was
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told by the travel provider, he didn't get a refund. it really does happen. most airlines, hotels, do have a refund possibly expect policy. there are complaint schemes for airlines and indeed other organisations. if you don't think you've been treated loudly or given a clear warning. if you booked it well in advance, you would say it's not cost that much money sea should get most of your money back. poor old sonia and derbyshire was supposed to go to egypt tomorrow but her husband is still poorly in hospital. she told the travel agent but because she is due to fly so soon, they said she can't get a penny back. it may well be this is the case and poor sonia, this is a nightmare situation. it's likely the travel agent has already the hotel orairline travel agent has already the hotel
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or airline company but i would basically give them a call and see, may be possible to transfer the holiday over if it's not too late but don't hesitate. always take that travel insurance. sonia, i hope your husband gets better. make sure you book insurance from as soon as you can. and if it's not cost the holiday company much money, they should give you most of your money back. from the costa del salford to the night sky. we all knowjust how beautiful the sky looks at night, but the results of a survey by the campaign to protect rural england, suggests more than half of us can't see as many stars as we should. the charity says it's because of light pollution, which can be seen in these pictures. they're launching a campaign to highlight the issues around using so much artificial light at night. joining us now from the campaign to protect rurual england is emma marrington. also here is the astronomer gary filde.
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good morning both. even in the studio, it's lovely having the lights turned out. this is what you do, you look at the stars. how much ofa do, you look at the stars. how much of a problem is light pollution? it's huge. there are so many people's nowadays without the ability to look up at the night sky. it's a wonderful thing, how many of us can it's a wonderful thing, how many of us can actually remember standing underneath an amazing starry sky. us can actually remember standing underneath an amazing starry skylj remember being in south africa for the foot or world cup and i was struck by how much you can see and if you're in a major city, you can't actually see that much. we asked people to count the number of stars they could see in the orion constellation. we said, you can see
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fewer than ten stars, that indicates severe light pollution is 50% of people who took part had severe light pollution so that's a real pity and only 2% of people saw truly dark skies so it shows the disparity between urban and rural areas but evenif between urban and rural areas but even if you are in a town or city, you still have light pollution travelling out into the countryside so even travelling out into the countryside so even if you are in a rural area, you are affected by light pollution. there is a need for lights in cities at night so what should be done? we're not saying there shouldn't be any at all. the technology is there. to have the right sort of lighting where and when you needed so many councils are looking to install dimming technology. in a residential street, you would have 50%. councils could do more. can do something.
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having domestic security lighting, only using it when needed. it's something we can all tackle. absolutely, yes. gary, some tips. i know you probably go further than others but in terms of enjoying the night sky, what are some tips? how long have i got? about 30 seconds. emma hasjust long have i got? about 30 seconds. emma has just mentioned, long have i got? about 30 seconds. emma hasjust mentioned, hasn't she, and we all have that innate sense. something way bigger than many of us experience. looking to really dark, starry skies, the way we access that somehow. on a good, clear, starry night, seeing the milky way is one of the most wonderful things. i think even from the centre of the city, the centre of london, a big urban conurbation, you see the planet on a nightly basis. a reasonably sized telescope, really
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appreciating, superbly dark skies, and getting to see the milky way, it's fantastic and of course, if you have a bigger telescope, you look between the spirit of stars, that's where it's really hard. it gives you a sense of perspective. on cue. it's one of the reasons i love camping. when you have to go for a week in the middle of the night. it's almost worth going. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor, sadiq khan, says he's "extremely concerned" about plans for climate change activists to target tube services today. nearly 300 people have been arrested over two days of action by the group extinction rebellion which has seen roads blocked in central london. british transport police says extra
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officers will be on duty. here's our reporter greg mckenzie. we're150,000 staff that work here, trhey‘re struggling to get in. already some of our stores have reported 25% down in sales. obviously retail is going through quite a difficult period at the moment, so it's hugely disruptive, so we really call they have been here since monday and police have since made 290 arrests. the campaigners say they are going to stay here today and are to cause mayhem and we believe many of them are planning to glue themselves to london underground trains this morning. extinction rebellion has apologised for disruption but says it believes that the protests are necessary to bring about action on climate change. today marks the 20th anniversary of the brixton market nail bombing. it was the first of three nail bomb attacks over two weeks in london targeting the capital's black, bangladeshi and gay communities other devices exploded in brick lane and the admiral duncan pub in soho. three people were killed and 140 others injured.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. let's start with the tube and as you heard commuters have been warned there could be disruption today because of planned action by climate change activists at the moment there are some unrelated minor delays clockwise on the circle line and also severe delays on the district line between tower hill and ealing broadway and richmond. and in kings cross, euston road is down to two lanes outside st pancras station for works. marble arch is blocked as part of the protest this is how it looks waterloo bridge, parliament square and oxford circus are also blocked. and in kings cross, euston road is down to two lanes outside st pancras station for works. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. there may be a little bit of mistiness out there this morning. it's not widespread but you may get a patch or two to the west and south of london, anywhere really,
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but it will lift to a day of warm sunshine. day by day this week, the temperature is steadily rising, thanks to the high pressure. a gentle easterly, south—easterly breeze so perhaps a little bit cooler out towards the essex coast. elsewhere, though, it is starting to feel pretty warm. some cloud bubbling up into the afternoon and temperatures reaching 20 celsius in central london. like i said, further towards the east, it's likely to feel a little cooler. now, overnight tonight, again, clear skies, temperatures not dropping too far thanks to the heat generated during the day. so not as cold as the last couple of nights. 7—8 celsius, the minimum temperature. thursday, more sunshine. dry weather in the forecast as we head closer to the easter weekend. temperatures in the low 20s by saturday. we could even see 24 or 25 celsius. that's all for now there'll be more updates from us across our breakfast bulletins of course. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it has just it hasjust gone it has just gone eight o'clock. our headlines today... 30 minutes from destruction. firefighters are praised for risking their lives to save notre—dame cathedral. solidarity along the seine. last night, hundreds of parisians turned out for a candlelit vigil to pay homage to the 850—year—old gothic structure. in other news... data seen by the bbc reveals almost £90 million has been spent by uk universities on gagging orders as academics claim they are being used to "silence" bullying and sexual misconduct claims. record numbers subscribe to netflix. the streaming giant says it's growing despite increasing its prices. but can it fend off competition from apple and disney? in sport, it gets messi for manchester united. no nou camp fairytale for ole gunnar solskjaer as his side are knocked out of the champions league by a brilliant barcelona.
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the view of earth from space. we'll find out how the team behind bbc one's latest documentary series captured these stunning shots. good morning. some of us seeing frost and raine first thing. they will clear and then we are in for a sunny day with variable amounts of cloud. then it will become warmer stop more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday 17th of april. our top story. firefighters have been praised for risking their lives to save notre dame cathedral, as it's revealed the historic building came within minutes of being completely destroyed. more than half a billion pounds has now been pledged to help fund the restoration, which president macron has promised will be completed within five years. but some architects warn his plans are too optimistic. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. chamber nusic playing
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hundreds joined together for a vigil on the banks of the seine last night to show solidarity in the face of this most unexpected of traumas. they sang hymns and said prayers and paid tribute to the courage of those who worked so hard to save this world famous landmark. inside the 850—year—old cathedral, the damage is now on display for all to see. the fire took hold of the ancient building's roof, burning through hundreds of tonnes of oak in just a few hours, raining ash and embers onto the floor below and toppling the famous spire. 500 firefighters battled for four hours before managing to get the blaze under control. another 30 minutes and the story would have been one of complete destruction. something paris would have found difficult to bear. though the stone structure is still standing, there has been a significant loss.
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as well as most of the roof, it is estimated between 5%—10% of the precious artworks housed in the cathedral have gone. but the crown of thorns some believe was worn byjesus on the cross, several important paintings, the medieval organ and the famous rose windows remain and this most historic of buildings will be repaired. translation: and, yes, we will rebuild the notre dame cathedral and it will be more beautiful than before and it will be done in five years. hundreds of millions of euros have already been pledged to that cause. notre dame has survived but is badly scarred and thoughts now turn to what will be one of the world's most important restoration projects. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. this is the scene in paris this morning, where the police and fire services will spend today and tomorrow assessing security and safety at notre dame cathedral.
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as we've been hearing, a team of 50 has been set up to investigate how the fire started. inafew in a few moments we will speak to a member of the team he rescued some of the cathedral‘s relics on monday night. uk universities have spent at least £87 million on payoffs with non—disclosure agreements since 2017. they're accused of using "gagging orders" to stop bullying, discrimination and sexual misconduct allegations becoming public. dozens of academics have told the bbc they were "harassed" out of theirjobs after making complaints. rianna croxford reports. i have been bullied for six years across two universities by the same man. once designed to protect trade secrets, now creating a culture of silence, nondisclosure agreements are keeping allegations of misconduct in the dark. feeling trapped but desperate to be heard. after i complained i was advised to sign an nda and leave.
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i ended up hundreds of miles away at a new university, only for the bully to follow me and continue his harassment. i'm depressed and it's cripling my career. the bbc has spoken to dozens of people who say they felt pressurised into signing an nda. many have faced racist and sexist bullying. others describe being groped and harassed. one woman said she was disciplined for not being at work on the day of her miscarriage. and this academic has decided to break her nda. it's actually been super helpful. she signed one during ongoing grievances relating to her disabilities, teaching and research role, particularly following her cancer diagnosis, that she felt had not been failry addressed. i want to break my nda because i want to encourage other people to break theirs because we cannot see each other and therefore we can't make a community. the university of liverpool said...
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the government is trying to tighten the rules on what nda's are used for. these women hope breaking their silence will stop them being misused. rianna croxford, bbc news. the metropolitan police say they've now arrested nearly 300 people involved in climate change protests in london. the demonstrations have led to road closures, trafficjams and disruption to bus services, affecting more than 500,000 commuters. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has urged the protesters not to go ahead with plans to try to disrupt tube services. mums—to—be should be routinely offered an ultrasound scan at 36 weeks to help stop risky breech deliveries when a baby's bottom orfeet emerge first. researchers from the university of cambridge say the extra scans would avoid 4,000 emergency caesareans and eight baby deaths a year in england. currently, midwives and doctors tend to rely on the shape and feel of the mother's bump to check.
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eating even moderate amounts of ham, bacon and red meat is linked to an increased risk of bowel cancer, according to new research. the study, led by oxford university, found that those who stuck to the nhs guideline of eating about 70 grams of red or processed meat a day — that's a slice of roast beef and a rasher of bacon — still increased their risk of bowel cancer by a fifth compared to those who ate very small amounts. so for people who are looking to reduce the risk of cancer then the advice is the less you eat the lower the risk. this doesn't mean that you have to completely give up bacon or go vegetarian if you don't want to, but simple ways that you can cut down on the amount that you are eating can all make a big difference in your risk of bowel cancer. british workers put in the longest hours of any country in the european union, according to a study by the tuc. the trade union says full—time employees in the uk average 42 hours a week — almost two more than
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a typical eu worker. it says workers in countries such as germany and denmark are more productive than their uk counterparts, despite working fewer hours. the rescue of the day. a dog found swimming 135 miles off the coast of thailand is now back on dry land. "boon—rod" — which means "the saved one" — was found by the crew of an oil tanker in the middle of the gulf of thailand. they believe he may have fallen off a fishing boat. he's said to be recovering well and a new home has already been lined up. ido i do love a dog rescue story. any dog story. 100 miles off the coast. amazing. more details are emerging of the precious works of art that have been saved from the fire which tore through the roof of the notre dame. remarkably, it appears that at least one of the famous stained—glass windows is still intact. we can speak to one of the men
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who worked tirelessly with his team to save the cathedral‘s relics, the chief architect of historic monuments, pierre—antoine gatier. hejoins us from he joins us from paris this morning with notre dame in the background. thank you for sharing some of your time. how would you feel today compared with how you felt yesterday when you heard and saw the fire notre dame behind you? those were very difficult times. i still feel totally depressed by this trauma that all the french people, parisians, are living today. i am devastated, i must say. in terms of the restoration work that is ahead of you, it is a huge project. president macron is trying to get
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things rebuilt in five years' time. what were you able to save yesterday? i think the first task was to deal with the safety of the area, then to work on starting to stabilise our cathedral, so the first night we tried to collect the major items, the relics said they we re major items, the relics said they were saved, and now we are starting the salvation process. we can see how upsetting it is for you. when you are in notre dame, what were you thinking about what shall i say what cani thinking about what shall i say what can i get here? that must have been quite a difficult decision to make. it isa quite a difficult decision to make. it is a difficult moment. even though there is a process and it is
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prepared when we have a list. that kind of event, there is a list, and it has been organised. but it is different. give us an idea of the feeling in the french capital. we saw moving pictures yesterday people singing, gathering together, watching notre dame while it burned. is there a real feeling of solidarity about making sure that the building, the beautiful building, we can see behind you is restored to its former glory? the movement of solidarity is in paris. what we are discovering all over the world, obviously with british friends, it is very important and helpful. it is not a question of money, even though it will be an
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issue and it is already debilitated. i think we need this support. do you think president macron by saying five years credit think that is optimistic? someone on the programme said yesterday something like this might takea said yesterday something like this might take a lot longer than that. it isa might take a lot longer than that. it is a challenge. we have to dream ofa it is a challenge. we have to dream of a safe, quick, clever archaeological process. if we all work together with all the best specialists, probably we will... when i say probably, we will have to succeed. there is a lot of debate at the moment about what techniques to use in the rebuilding will do you
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continue with a wooden wreath or a more modern technique? do you have a persuasion with regard to that? —— wooden roof. this is a philosophical debate. it is a philosophical issue. the historical association has often been faced with that kind of issue. very often we made a decision that to use modern techniques. steel construction, in the early 19th century, concrete structure in the early 20th century. i think there is a very open debate and a major one. should we recreate the original would stretch up another timber framework, or would we prefer to do
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something that is dating from the 21st—century? that is the issue. good to talk to you this morning. thank you for coming on the programme to tell us more about that. he was one of those responsible for trying to get into notre dame yesterday and taking out some of the relics, some of the art. they had to leave quite a lot on the wall because it was too heavy to carry out. it was interesting getting a handle on the big decisions about how they go about it. as he was putting it and it is a philosophical debate. how you do it? why you do it? it will be billions of pounds, went to? shall we say it is glorious weather this weekend? good morning, everyone. the of a flying ointment on sunday and monday. plenty of sunshine and
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turning warmer. at the moment there is dense fog in the south of england that will lift, as will the rain in scotland. just the risk of a shower in the midlands and east anglia in the afternoon but it is a small risk. temperatures will be lower on the coast than any lad but the top temperature today will be 20, 21 around london. this evening and overnight in a still clear skies. all this cloud coming in from the north sea stop some coastal missed and fog to look out for as well and quite a breezy night. —— coastal mist. the wind is changing to more ofa mist. the wind is changing to more of a south—easterly. we are pulling in continental air. the amber colours represent higher
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temperatures. first thing on thursday we had to lose the mist and fog. it would be quite breezy in the south. temperature wise, to 20, 21. thursday 21 in the midlands heading up thursday 21 in the midlands heading up to north—west england as well. 17 in is not to be sneezed at. pollen levels are high. the start off with mist and fog patches which will lift. almost wall—to—wall blue skies with hardly ploughed in sight. we will see sea breezes develop along the coasts. —— hardly a cloud. you can see how widely across the uk the temperatures have gone up. saturday we are looking at a dry day with a lot of sunshine. in the west of scotla nd lot of sunshine. in the west of scotland there will be thicker cloud
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and murkier conditions. the temperature is still above average in stornoway but down on where it will be on thursday and friday to 12 and then we are up to 23,24, will be on thursday and friday to 12 and then we are up to 23, 24, 25 to the west of london. here is the week at the front going down into the north of england and wales. the odd light spot of rain. ahead of it we are in milderair. i light spot of rain. ahead of it we are in milder air. i want to show you easter monday. on easter monday we may have more rain coming on courtesy of the weather front. the timing and position of it could change. it is worth keeping a check on that. thank you. i will look forward to the bank holiday even more now. what do sci—fi, nina simone and duke ellington have in common? what do you think? i have no idea. i
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am not going to be a comedian. well, they are all inspirations for the 2019 bbc proms. in a moment, we'll speak to the presenter katie derham, and beatboxer jason singh, who will be performing. but before we do, let's remind ourselves why the bbc proms is regarded as one of the best classical music festivals. classical music
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# i will go out and make it # or steal it or take it # goodbye.# that was stirling staff. we had a few months before the grand finale. thank you for being here this morning. sell the proms 2019. what is different? is it bigger and better? it is. it always feels like
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it is more exciting. another two months packed full of music. may the 11th, just get out there. the guy who invented the proms, henry wood and conducted it for many years, it is his anniversary. lots of talk about him. his mission in life was to get the most music to the most people, which is what we can do. you can still buy tickets on the day? 1400 standing tickets are available every day in the albert hall. you can stand down any arena or up in the gallery stop some people sneeze up the gallery stop some people sneeze up there, listening to music, for £6. -- up there, listening to music, for £6. —— snooze up there. up there, listening to music, for £6. -- snooze up there. it is not just classical music, it is people like jason. how do you describe your music? it is a mixture of nature in
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all sorts of effects, channelled through their voice. what will you be doing? i will be working with people, around text with ravens and starlings, incorporating the voice and beats with all those kinds of sounds. i think we ought to hear a little bit stop give us a burst. what are you going to do now? just some sounds from nature and beats and sound effects. he beatboxes.
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wow! thank you very much. you are particularly inspired by nature. you have slowed down bad song, have you? it isa have slowed down bad song, have you? it is a mixture of that. —— bird song. it is walking into woodlands and forestry environments and absorbing the sounds i hear from birds stop in the city, things like robbins, blackbirds, thrushes, tree sparrows. “— robbins, blackbirds, thrushes, tree sparrows. —— robins. it is mimicking it as closely as i can. all over the world people incorporate different techniques into what they do with their voice. and incorporating
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wildlife in that. it excites me because it moves the beatboxing artform from just being about rhythms to incorporating other sounds. we mentioned sci-fi. 50 yea rs sounds. we mentioned sci-fi. 50 years since the landing of the moon. funny enough the planets on the 50th anniversary stop there will be a sci—fi prom and music from sci—fi films. that will be one of the late night proms, starting at ten o'clock in the evening, incorporating different genres of music. we have nina simone and duke ellington. lots of stuff going on. there is also a
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cbeebies from. lots of family friendly things. everybody is welcome. if someone is watching this morning thinking they are won over by jason and want to be there, what is the best way to find information? go to the proms website and find out information about the different shows. if the other particular kind of classical music or fancy beatboxing or the hip—hop prom, all the information will be there and tickets will go on sale on the 11th of may. or turn up on the night and give it a whirl. thank you. i have a lwa ys give it a whirl. thank you. i have always been quite proud of my bad impression. now i am deeply embarrassed. i am impression. now i am deeply embarrassed. iam never going impression. now i am deeply embarrassed. i am never going to do it again. i could be your backing bird. you can be their front bed. i will be your backing bed. —— bird.
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you can hear every note on bbc radio 3, and you'll be able to catch up on the proms on the bbc sounds app. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, temperatures on the way up in the next few days and that comes with a good deal of dry and fine weather and plenty of sunshine. today, after a misty start for some, a good deal of sunshine coming through this afternoon with good sunny spells and patchy cloud. the risk of a couple of showers in east
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anglia, the midlands, southern parts of northern england. temperatures up a little bit on what we saw yesterday, widely in the mid to high teens, locally we could see 20 or 21 degrees. this evening and overnight, any showers will tend to fade away, some clear spells put more in the wa ke some clear spells put more in the wake of low cloud, mist and hill fog feeding in from the east. temperatures not falling too far, 4-9d temperatures not falling too far, 4—9d overnight. into the easter weekend, plenty of dry and fine weather to begin with, temperatures peaking on saturday but the growing chance of something a bit more u nsettled chance of something a bit more unsettled feeding in from the north—west through the second half of the weekend.
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this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. full stream ahead: netflix piles on the viewers and the profits as the competition for subscribers hots up. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 17th april. the company is spending billions to try to keep ahead of its rivals. we'll find out how the competition plans to fight back. also in the programme... going for growth. china's economy picks up speed — we'll be live in beijing to find out why.

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